7 Jul 2019

Tackle The Tough Stuff: Jarrod Sammut

"I do believe that everyone’s got a life worth living, even if they can’t see it themselves, so pick up the phone or have a conversation with somebody."

Jarrod Sammut’s brother, Daniel, lost his life at 27, leaving behind sons and daughters, a mother without a son and a brother without brother, it’s not just Daniel though, 84 men a week are killed by suicide. 

There’s a stigma around mental health and it’s a barrier that everyday men around the United Kingdom are trying to break down, it’s a barrier that Super League is helping to break. 

There is so much power in mental health, it is not always visible to those around, too many suffer in silence, they carry the weight of the world on their shoulders every day, not knowing that talking to someone and understanding, “it’s ok to not be ok,” could help save lives. 

Wigan Warriors star Sammut knows all too well the pain and anguish that mental health can have when his brother, Daniel, was lost to mental health. 

“I think my little brother didn’t ever really know that he was struggling, but he just one day said that he had had enough, and he hanged himself,”

“I think my little brother didn’t ever really know that he was struggling, but he just one day said that he had had enough, and he hanged himself,” said Sammut. 

Daniel posted a picture on Facebook, dressed in a suit and stated, ‘all dressed up and nowhere to go’, the morning after Jarrod received a phone call from his Mum to find out that Daniel had been taken from the world by suicide. 

“I thought maybe I could have made a difference just by having a chat or reaching out, but again, I didn’t see any signs, I didn’t know.

“You don’t really know the signs because a lot of people that are struggling you couldn’t tell.

“You think they’re happy as larry, or their lives are going really great so that there was quite tough and difficult,” admitted Sammut. 

Those that experience suicidal thoughts just may not want to talk, those who suffer from depression may not know they’re struggling and don’t want to seek any help.

“I do believe that everyone’s got a life worth living, even if they can’t see it themselves, so pick up the phone or have a conversation with somebody,”

And by talking about their mental health, they are passing their burden on to someone else, so it’s easier to just stay silent and struggle through their troubles: “I do believe that everyone’s got a life worth living, even if they can’t see it themselves, so pick up the phone or have a conversation with somebody,” said Sammut. 

There’s also a sense of male pride, it seems easier for males to suffer in silence than to open up, cry or show they do have emotions.

“Society doesn’t put as much focus on it, especially being male, you know we don’t talk about our issues and our problems.

“It’s something that’s not easy and as a male we like to think of ourselves as quite macho and nothing bothers us, but everyone does get effected quite differently, so if we can make a difference in one small way, then I think we should do everything we can.

“We don’t like to burden other people with our problems, and that there is part and parcel of the stigma about how we don’t talk about our issues. 

“I think it's hugely important that we understand that it’s not weak to speak,” said Sammut. 

Super League is trying to shine a spotlight on mental health and wellbeing with #TackleTheToughStuff, to find out more, click here.

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